A Quick Overview Of End Citizens United Milestones

It was just in 2008 when James Bopp, the man behind End Citizens and his lawyer Terre were literary mocked out of a Washington court. This is recorded in an article on Mother Jones. The two were seeking the right to air a movie entitled Hillary. The movie was on demand at the time but unfortunately, the court ruled against them on the grounds that the film was longer than others. This case was overseen by Judge Royce Lambeth of the US District Court.

Things were different a couple of years later and no one could laugh. The Supreme Court came to James’s rescue and reversed Judge Royce decision. Citizens United developed from a culmination of many years of diligence and hard work by James Bopp to scheme through the Nation’s finance regulations. This was a case that no one gave him a chance. James would argue that there is no loophole in the First Amendment. His work shows the conflict infused when trying to block money flow in a political setup without necessarily prohibiting the speech right.

Like End Citizens United on Facebook

Citizens United has taken milestones and the organization does more than just protect films and books. According to a post by USA Today dated 4th of April, 2017, the organization raised $4 million dollars early this year and is planning for $35 million projection. Here are some of the ideas that stood out on the Post:

End Citizens United Focuses on Making Money

The organization not only focuses on getting money from politicians and political institutions but also aims at making huge money independently. For example, the group collected over $4 million in the first quarter of the year. The group is focussing on raising $35 million before the 2018 midterm congressional election. If compared to the 2016 elections, this is considered high as a $25 million margin is expected.

End Citizens United Attracts

Around 100,000 individuals contributed to the $4 million returns during the first three months of the year. 40% of them are believed to be first timers. The group leaders are mandated to ensure that the number continues rising over years. Recently, the organizing committee convinced contributors to make $500,000 donation to Jon Ossof’s campaign. Jon Ossof, a first timer Democrat candidate, was surprised by the move but appreciated it.

According to Muller, a former director of the senate campaign team, End Citizen is weighing options on what race to be actively involved next year. However, the group is focused on defending Democrat’s Sherrod Brown and Jon Tester of Ohio and Montana respectively.

End Citizens United Limits on Individual Donation

To safeguard the interest of both parties, the organization does not accept a contribution above $5,000 from a single entity. The Donation Cap is a safe one that makes sure that the donors are not overly exploited. It also aims at distancing the contributor from the membership rights.

End Citizens United: Gunning For Greater Influence In The 2018 Midterm Elections

When End Citizens United’s leadership announced on 3 August 2017 that it will support Rep. Jacky Rosen in her quest to replace Sen. Heller in the upcoming 2018 midterm elections, it marked the second consecutive time the grassroots political action committee was throwing its weight behind the legislator. In 2016, the organization openly declared its support of the legislator. While making the announcement, Tiffany Muller who is the president and executive director of ECU noted that Rep. Rosen’s steadfast support for the reforming of America’s electoral financing laws was the primary reason for their unsolicited support for the aspiring senator. She noted that Rep. Rosen’s push for kicking big money out of American politics compares starkly with that of the incumbent.

Over the years, Rep. Rosen has carved out a political reputation of staunchly opposing the special interests groups who have held the politicians hostage with their huge financial base. Rep. Rosen accepted the endorsement and thanked End Citizens United for their steadfast support over the years. Noting that big money and special interests group have muzzled the political voice of Nevadans, Rep. Rosen added that her fight will extend beyond electoral financing reforms. She highlighted healthcare, gun control and climate change as some of the issues she will continue to for at the Capitol Hill when elected. She argued that these issues are not currently being addressed by the incumbent senator because of his longstanding relationship with the special interests groups who financed his campaigns.

Like Ens Citizens United on Facebook.

Pushing for Electoral Reform in the Upcoming 2018 Midterm Elections

The upcoming 2018 U.S. midterm elections will present End Citizens United (ECU) a unique opportunity to further push for a cause that it has made its sole mission: pushing big money and special interest groups out of American political dispensation. Over the years, the organization has dedicated significant resources towards this cause by materially and morally supporting political candidates dedicated to repealing the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. During the 2016 election, ECU raised over $25 million in the form of donations from individuals and organizations that support its cause.

However, going by the amount donations it received within the first three months of 2017, ECU projects the donations for the next election cycle in 2018 will exceed the 2016 mark. Going by the $4 million it raised within the first quarter, ECU’S management is convinced that it will raise approximately $35 million by the time Americans go for the 2018 midterm elections. This is despite capping their donation at $5,000 per individual donation. The positive projection is also informed by an increase in the number of new donors, which has hit the 40,000 mark in the first quarter of 2017. End Citizens United also saw the number of repeat donors rise to 60,000. The organization hopes to raise enough funds to support the various candidates it will back in the upcoming elections.

Andrea McWilliams’s Career Path as a Lobbyist and Political Fundraiser

Andrea McWilliams is a political fundraiser and lobbyist known for her philanthropic endeavors. FOX News, the USA Today, and the Wall Street Journal have also praised her for giving out political insights with persuasion and grit. The Texas Women’s Chamber of Commerce acknowledged her efforts and achievements in the development of strategies in the political arena. Andrew’s work has also been covered in several Texas publications.

Awards and Career Achievements

In 2016, Andrea McWilliams received the Profiles in Power and 2016 Texas Businesswoman of the Year Finalist awards. The Austin Business Journal and the Texas Women’s Chamber of Commerce presented these awards. The Girl Scouts of Central Texas also acknowledged her philanthropic efforts as their Woman of Distinction. In 2017, McWilliams was the recipient of the Style Setter Award that was presented during the Austin Fashion Week.

Public Strategies Inc. hired McWilliams as the chief of staff while she was 21 years old. The famed public relations company saw her potential in leadership as she was starting her professional career. Today, McWilliams runs a service firm dedicated to offering consultancy services on governmental affairs. She co-founded the company with her husband.

Charity work

As a resident of Old Enfield, TX, Andrea McWilliams has helped the local community through several philanthropic initiatives. She served as a board member for charity organizations, including the Austin Children in Crisis and the Waterloo President’s Council. Her board membership allowed her to contribute to the fundraising initiatives for these charity institutions.

Andrea McWilliams has also been part of the KillCancer Foundation. Her involvement in this fundraising organization was to help in raising funds for cancer prevention and treatment. She was also a member of Mamma Jamma that is dedicated to raising money to help breast cancer patients. Andrea McWilliams was a celebrity dancer for Dancing with the Stars event to raise funds for Center for Child Protection.